The Spice and a Slice of Utah Life

Utah Life cover

I am happy to report that my poem, Spice of Life was featured in the July-August – Issue 3 of Utah Life magazine. This is a fantastic new publication that is worthy of a subscription if you like reading about Utah out-of-doors activities, and history in good essays, articles and poetry. Issue 3 is on newsstands now. Here’s the link to the magazine.

https://utahlifemag.com/

Spice of Life-Utah Life

 

Copyright, 2018. Robert Baldwin, Before the Downbeat

Images used with permission from the editors at Utah Life magazine.

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Musical Gratitude: Annual Thanksgiving Post

claesz-_pieter_-_still-life_with_musical_instruments_-_1623_wide-3edcf66d47681a697a01469ae0f594d53c6ea77d-s1500-c85

A slightly edited version of a post I’ve been sharing on this day since 2012.

It’s Thanksgiving weekend in the U.S., a tradition where Americans express gratitude for what we have in our lives. For musicians, our “musical thanks” often leads to a specific instrument, talent or to the music of certain composers. Some of us even express thanks for Music itself, as something that has shaped our lives, personalities and world-view.

I’d like to add one more that is often left off musician’s lists: Gratitude for our fellow musicians. Music is a community activity. No one learns, creates, or performs music in a vacuum. We have all relied on teachers, peers, mentors and colleagues. We interact and learn from each other. It’s a great time to remember how closely we are all connected.

Think for a moment about a symphony orchestra. I certainly do. As a conductor, I am the only person on the stage not making a sound, yet I rely on each and every musician in the orchestra to play the notes, execute the phrasing and find the passion within themselves to express the music. I must trust their musicianship and willingness to share with the ensemble. Everyone has a job to do, and they are remarkably adept at it. It seemingly defies logic that this collection of diverse instruments and personalities could ever make a unified whole, yet it works. All are partners in a sonic adventure; one we ultimately undertake for the audience. And of course, thanks to our audiences, as well. We literally would not do this without you.

Within each of our musical offerings, we have many connections. It is truly mind-boggling. The viola player may not think of the oboe player much after the tuning note, but her well-played oboe solo may set the mood for a memorable performance. Similarly, the control and artistry of a timpani player can help the pulse and excitement of an entire ensemble. And let’s not forget the string section, where our stand partner just turned the page so the music could continue uninterrupted. Even the mundane matters!

When thinking deeper into the past, our gratitude can extend far beyond a particular composer who wrote a great piece. The copyist who labored over the manuscript, the publisher who provided your copy, the musicologist who discovered new insights, the critic who keep the piece alive in the repertoire by extolling it’s virtues to the masses…And that’s just the beginning!

So this Thanksgiving weekend, I am feeling tremendous gratitude for my many musical partners, known and unknown, who help me on a daily basis. My own musical journey would not be possible without you.

Thank you!

Photo credit: Pieter Claesz’s Still Life with Musical Instruments (1623). Wikimedia Commons

Copyright, 2012 Robert Baldwin/Before the Downbeat (edited, 2016)

 

The Rite Connections

Monteaux and Stravinsky

Recently, I discovered there was only one-degree separating me from an event that changed music history forever.
The most amazing coincidences happen in life. Last Sunday I was at a dinner reception for a concert I conducted in Lexington, Kentucky. I was seated next to an older woman who grew up in Maine. As we got to talking, she asked if I knew who Pierre Monteaux was. Well, indeed I did! Monteaux was the conductor who premiered Stravinsky’s “Rite of Spring” in Paris, 103 years ago. The fuse was lit–her eyes twinkled as she mentioned that as a girl growing up in Maine, her next-door neighbor was, believe it or not, Pierre Monteaux. (I’m sure a memorable sound from that reception was the sound of my jaw hitting the table). She mentioned how he was like a grandfather to her and her siblings, bouncing them on his knee and playing with them in the yard.
This weekend, I find myself conducting my second “Rite” in performance (I’ve also played it twice). But now there is a living connection to the watershed event in the history of music. Layers of meaning added with a chance encounter.
Mind. Blown. Apart.

If you are in the Salt Lake region, come check out the performance with the Salt Lake Symphony.  Here are the details:

______________________________________________________

Salt Lake Symphony: Primal Energy!
Saturday March 19, 2016 7:30 pm

Libby Gardner Concert Hall
Hasse Borup, violin
Robert Baldwin, conductor

Dvořák Slavonic Dances #2 and 7
Jett Hitt Yellowstone for Violin and Orchestra (Utah Premiere)
Stravinsky The Rite of Spring

Few pieces have the primal energy as Stravinsky’s The Rite of Spring. This year marks a first for the Salt Lake Symphony, our initial performance of this monumental work. Originally intended for ballet when composed in 1913, the piece has become a staple in the concert hall as the quintessential work of the early 20th century. With its driving rhythms and eerie sounds, it’s a piece that creates a lasting memory for performers and audiences alike. It’s not the only legacy we will celebrate at this concert, though. We will open the concert with our annual side-by-side performance, featuring talented young musicians sitting alongside our musicians. After their rousing opening of Dvořák’s Slavonic Dances, we will perform the Utah premiere of Jett Hitt’s Yellowstone Concerto, with Dr. Hasse Borup playing the solo violin part. Join us for and evening of music and musicians filled with energy and excitement. This is an event not to be missed!


Tickets $10 adults, $5 students and seniors.
Available by calling 801-531-7501 or at the door with cash, check or credit card.

Be sure to attend the free pre-concert lecture by Dr. Baldwin, discussing the culture behind the music, at 6:15 p.m. in Room 270, right behind the concert hall.

 

Shining Star for Us to See, What Our Muse Can Truly Be

1920px-All_Gizah_Pyramids

Like for so many, 2016 has resulted in trips down my own personal memory lane; several event-inspired retrospectives of music. Truly, there is a lot of popular music (of any generation) that is not worth remembering, but the recent losses of iconic pop musicians reminds us that there is also a lot worth taking the effort to know. Most recently I’ve been revisiting music by Earth, Wind and Fire, after trips through the tracks of Bowie, Jefferson Starship, Tower of Power, and The Eagles. Losing great musicians has a way of causing reflection on their work, though some of it may be covered by the dust of time.

Of course, it is no more tragic to lose important musicians than any other human being. After all, save David Bowie, most we’ve lost in 2016 were already semi or completely retired. They, like all people, leave behind family members, friends and neighbors who defined their personal and private lives.  But it is somewhat tragic to realize that we’ve also risked forgetting a generation of imaginative and hopeful MUSIC, from which their creators hoped to make a difference in the world.

Dust off the years and the slightly dated groove, and a whole generation emerges–humans inspired by recent moon landings, technological advances, and ends of (certain) wars. The music promised an upward trajectory for the human species, reaching past the lingering problems of racism, sexism and nuclear proliferation that haunted the times. The spirit of hope opened by two Kennedys and a King took root in the people and truly bloomed in the 70s and early 80s, most notably through the music of the time. The best popular music helped define a bright future unlike anything else could. It helped us see our brighter future, beyond a world still mired in the Watergates, Iran hostage situations, and oil embargo crises.

The music didn’t change the world, of course, but it hinted that we, the people, had the power to do so. That we again fell into the trap of greed and self-indulgence only reinforces it is indeed only us, and none other, who must make the changes to insure a better future. It also illustrates how difficult that is to actually achieve.

The music of Bowie, EWF, et al, is thankfully still there for any and all generations to explore. It also serves as a beacon and challenge to the musicians of today. And if we don’t express hope through the arts, there is a danger that the message may be forgotten. Then it will truly be too late to make a difference.

So at the risk of sounding too hippy-dippy, and to humbly add to the the great songwriter, Burt Bacharach,

What the world needs now is:

 Love, Sweet Love…

But also music with: soaring string backgrounds, electrifying brass licks, more funk, and less junk.

And lyrics that: uplift without tearing down, invoke imagination, promote possibility, encourage equality.

And ideas that challenge us to hope, dream, create, and grow.

Especially, grow.

 

Copyright 2016. Robert Baldwin. Before the Downbeat.

Photo credit: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Egyptian_pyramids#/media/File:All_Gizah_Pyramids.jpg

 

Tchaiku-Haiku

Concert work for musicians often comes in clumps. Such was the case with my last few weeks. So after wrapping up 6 concerts within 16 days, I finally felt the exhaustion settling into my brain and body. But instead of merely expressing it in a blunt, factual way, I decided to have some fun with it. Creativity’s seeds are always present, and sometimes sprout when you least expect it–like at midnight on a Tuesday.

Post Rehearsal Late Night Double Haiku:

No energy left;
Perhaps I’ll lie in the snow,
For a little rest.
…..

But there was no snow;
So I just walked to the car,
And drove myself home.

 

Copyright, 2015 Robert Baldwin, Before the Downbeat

Orcas Islands Chamber Music Festival

2015-May-14-web-sliderI’m heading to the great Pacific Northwest to do a couple of classes and preconcert lecture for the Orcas Islands Chamber Music Festival this weekend.  Talking about music is a lot like writing about music, just no need to spell check! If you find yourself in the region, come check out this fantastic summer festival in an unforgettable setting!

http://oicmf.org/

The Lions of Childhood

Today’s blog entry is a departure from the usual posts about music.  But not really.  Musicians often have passions that are informed by compassion for others.  Now you know one of mine.

cecilthelionAslan. Elsa. The Lions Club International, Snagglepuss, Lippy the Lion. MGM. The Wizard of Oz.
Here’s an idea. Think of all the lions from your childhood: in literature, movies, cartoons, corporate logos, sports teams. The image is ubiquitous for a reason. The life of a big cat, and lions in particular, stand for something integral to the human psyche, as a mythic, yet LIVING symbol. It helps define our social group, concepts of strength, family, struggle and success. In many ways, the lion is a reflection of ourselves.

People have been the cause of many extinctions. Some by direct actions; some by changing the ecology. We wiped out the Passenger Pigeon in recent times, and probably the Mastodon and Wooly Mammoth in prehistoric times. Humans pushed the lion out of Europe and most of Asia. People almost wiped out the American Bison and beaver because of greed, but then the ECONOMICS changed. People almost wiped out the American Bald Eagle due to DDT usage, but realized in enough time for CHANGE to be made. But there is little doubt that our species exerts great pressure on the world.

But we humans also have a kernel of understanding, or at least the potential for it– knowing that PRESERVATION extends beyond our own species and individual self-interests. While civilization had always pressed against the wild, we as a species have also gained deep meaning from it. Cave paintings from far in the past show our interaction with nature. Religious stories and metaphors we still value today include every manner of animal: reptiles, primates, insects, amphibians, fish, whales, birds, etc. And big cats, notably lions.

OK. Now imagine yourself traveling 150-200+ years into the future. Children may read these works containing lions (or other animals) and see these images as no longer living. They may hear more than one movement of Camille Saint-Saens’ Carnival of the Animals as fossils. They may need reminding that a lion was once a real thing, like a dinosaur or saber-toothed cat. Or a thing mythologized, like a dragon–something belonging to the past, not the present.

It’s not a far putt from where we are today. Does that bother you? It does me.
Now, think of doing something about it, stopping the slaughter and reversing the trend. We’ve done it before for some species. We’ve failed to save others. Will we choose to at least try? I, for one, know on which side of the line to stand.

Copyright, 2015. Robert Baldwin, Before the Downbeat.