Gentle Action: Recommended Reading

Just finished “Gentle Action” by F. David Peat, a remarkable short book, packed with sage advice. This is not some fluffy New Age concept, but rather a well-considered exploration of how communities, nations and societies interact, succeed and fail. The subtitle of the book, “Bringing Creative Change to a Turbulent World,” says it all, and the author’s insistence that effective change must happen from within is supported by examples from quantum physics, wave theory, chaos theory, and the study of self-organizing systems. F. David Peat is a respected and prolific author on a variety of subjects, from Native American physics to Jungian psychology and quantum mechanics. This little volume is packed with great food for thought. The questions at the end of each chapter required good reflection. Recommended for any leader feeling stuck and anyone desiring creative change in their company, church, social group, nation, world, or family. I guess that means all of us!

Here’s the Amazon link to the book:

http://www.amazon.com/dp/8895604032/ref=cm_sw_r_fa_dp_rTh8pb0T81G1P

You also may be interested in F. David Peat’s Pari Center in Italy: “The Pari Center for New Learning is located in the quiet hilltop village of Pari, some 25km south of Siena. It was created by F. David Peat and Maureen Doolan as a congenial location where people can think, learn, meet together, carry out their projects and enjoy the surrounding environment and community.” (description from the Pari website)

http://www.paricenter.com/

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4 thoughts on “Gentle Action: Recommended Reading

  1. This one will go on the bookshelf – and be read. I was persuaded by this: “the creative intervention of a single person can end up being more effective than an aid program organized by a multimillion-dollar organization”. I’ve experienced that dynamic at work, and am interested to see how Peat expands it.

    I have a suspicion we’ve just lived through a small example of gentle action in my town. The project was the saving of a century-old, historic oak. I’ve written about it, and there was a very nice video summation produced. You can find the story here.

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